Catholic learning space

Visiting the Catholic Education Melbourne website I noticed a section about Learning spaces.

The website discusses how schools should develop their physical landscape and how to direct learning. They aim to create learning spaces that are open, flexible, environmentally sustainable, including ICT and furniture. It states that areas should include collaborative learning, individual learning, small group and support services. These are some of the learning spaces that I have looked at in my blog.

If you would like to read more about this, view:

http://www.ceomelb.catholic.edu.au/learning-teaching/learning-spaces/physical-landscape/

 

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Presentation

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I have created a Prezi to explain the different types of learning spaces:
~ the classroom and the school
~ beyond the classroom
~ the electronic learning space
~ the individual learning space
~ the group learning space
~ learning in the 21st century

Click on this link:
http://prezi.com/xdtvocnh7aqq/present/?auth_key=0xytw7i&follow=ux_o1wd-86jy#65_50139505

Third cultural space

Flag_map_of_Australia_(Aboriginal_Australian_Flag)What is the third cultural space?

It is a learning space where the Aboriginal ways of knowing interconnects with the Western ways of knowing. It aims to learn about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and perspectives within schools to change ways of thinking and build reconciliation for the future.

Teachers and students alike hold their own personal views which include individual beliefs, values and cultural understandings. As teachers, the third cultural space is important for students to learn about because it related to our past and future. Our Australian history is unique and building respect for each other is vital to understand different view points.

By incorporating the 8 Aboriginal ways of learning in the class then there may form a change in cultural thinking. Thus, this third cultural space can begin to develop.

(Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspective in Schools. Retrieved from http://deta.qld.gov.au/indigenous/pdfs/eatsips_2011.pdf)

(Wikimedia Commons, 2012. Flag map of Australia (Aboriginal Australian flag) [Image]. Retrieved from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flag_map_of_Australia_(Aboriginal_Australian_Flag).png)

8 Aboriginal ways of learning

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Tell a story.
Make a plan.
Think and do.
Draw it.
Take it outside.
Try a new way.
Watch first, then do.
Share it with others.

8 Aboriginal ways of learning is a framework that allows teachings to include Aboriginal perspective through these learning techniques. These links are:
~ Story sharing: connect through narratives that are shared.
~ Learning maps: visuals are used to map out learning processes to follow.
~ Non-verbal: without using words learning is applied through seeing, thinking, acting.
~ Symbols and images: use images to gain knowledge with art, land and objects.
~ Land links: Context changes to local land/place and linked to learning.
~ Non-linear: Build different ideas and perspectives to gain deeper understanding.
~ Deconstruct/Reconstruct: Working with wholes then breaking down into parts.
~ Community links: Connecting with real-life community and learning from local views.

(8 Aboriginal ways of learning factsheet, May 2012. Retrieved from http://intranet.ecu.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0016/510073/8-Aboriginal-ways-of-learning-factsheet.pdf)

Studying scorpions

I thought I might post my drawing of Scorpionum: antiquis creaturae pulcritudinem.
The scorpion I drew in science was a Urodacus elongates (I think). The opportunity to observe a real-life scorpion was a fantastic experience and one that is very effective in the classroom. It reminds me of the zoo/wildlife incursions organised at schools these days. Seeing animals and creatures in real-life can be so enriching and it brings to life everything that you have been learning about.

The learning space while drawing these scorpions was individual but also grouped because you were able to discuss features of the scorpions with peers nearby. The lesson was student-centred where plenty of questions were raised about the specific features found on this magnificent creature. It was amazing to notice the perspectives of everyone in the class… some drew the main outline of the scorpion and others noticed the tiniest details.

In my drawings, I tried to draw the scorpion from both the top view and bottom view. One of the drawings are incomplete (as you can see) but I enjoyed the lesson nonetheless.

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Innovating for the heart

This is a beautiful and insightful blog by Melite.
Educate the mind and the heart with COMPASSION, ACCEPTANCE and TOLERANCE.

Petroula Karagianni

A recent tweet by GOOD put a very interesting idea out there: “Why Every School Needs an ‘Innovation Day”, which I believe should go further and towards having an innovation session/slam, every week, in every school, so that the practice becomes a habit.  7 years ago with my team in The Netherlands we used to have weekly “That’s my Theory” sessions, which were of the most impact full and interesting sessions I have participated in. The issue with innovation is this: if you ask a room of people “who of you considers him/herself innovative?” then, my theory is, that only a few people will raise their arms. Whereas, if you ask “Which one of you has a theory or an idea of how things could be done differently?” then, I am sure the result will be different; many arms in the air and many nodding heads. Now, I understand…

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